Joint Venture Spells Success for Manufacturing

- Innovation Boulevard, State College Pennsylvania -

Innovation often comes from the unlikeliest of places but in this particular instance, there's some irony in that a joint venture to pursue the latest advances in 3D-Printing, originates from Innovation Boulevard in State College, PA.

 200 Innovation Blouevard, Home to Solid Innovations' Beginnings

200 Innovation Blouevard, Home to Solid Innovations' Beginnings

The joint venture, Solid Innovations, LLC, is the brain-child of two prominent players in the local Additive arena:

Solid Dynamics, LLC - State College's Premier Rapid Prototyping Firm

and

Imperial Machine & Tool Co. - A 75 Year Old Advanced Manufacturing Company with Years of Expertise in Additive Manufacturing

Solid Innovations, LLC is the derivation from a meeting between executives from both of the aforementioned companies. This discussion, focused primarily on the difficulties that exist within 3D-Printing, generated the intellectual foundation from which Solid Innovations was born.

 
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Imperial Machine & Tool Co. Background:

Imperial Machine & Tool Co. is an Advanced Manufacturing company founded in 1943. Imperial is focused on tackling the most challenging and difficult projects in industry, while providing the highest levels of customer service.

Some of Imperial's specialties include precision CNC machining, metal additive manufacturing (metal 3D printing), refractory metal working, precision welding, custom vacuum equipment and much more.

 Imperial Machine & Tool Co. Personnel Preparing a Metal 3D-Printer 

Imperial Machine & Tool Co. Personnel Preparing a Metal 3D-Printer 

Solid Dynamics, LLC Background:

Solid Dynamics, LLC, started in 2014 as a design firm for entrepreneurs, local inventors and academia in the surrounding State College area. Primarily focused on bringing client ideas to life, Solid Dynamics utilizes the latest techniques in manufacturing to produce quality prototypes and end-use components.

Manufacturing at Solid Dynamics is often performed through the use of 3D-Printers, so much so, that they've purchased well over 30 Additive Manufacturing systems since the companies inception.

 Solid Dynamics' Personnel Repairing a Printer after an In-Process Failure 

Solid Dynamics' Personnel Repairing a Printer after an In-Process Failure 

3D-Printing can be a quite profitable business model when done at scale. From Solid Dynamics' perspective, 3D-Printing, while a useful tool to produce prototypes, failed to provide mass production capabilities. This lack of productivity was often accompanied by 3D-Printer inability to alert operators of failures during the printing process. Therefore, highly trained operators were required to manually monitor or 'baby-sit' 3D-Printers during the entire fabrication process to prevent wasted material and machine time due to printing errors. The result of this process meant significant overhead cost and scalability issues for Solid Dynamics.

From Imperial's perspective, the problem with 3D-Printing was much more serious. For 75 years, Imperial has stood behind their time honored principles of Quality, Innovation and Service in all aspects of their manufacturing processes. After adopting metal 3D-Printing in 2013 and purchasing the required equipment, Imperial realized that quality and traceability were significantly lacking in Additive Manufacturing (AM). 

With traditional manufacturing technologies, such as precision CNC machining, straightforward answers are expected when asking for basic quality & traceability related information. When assessing parts in the modern manufacturing environment, customers commonly ask questions like:

  • What is the metallurgy & chemical composition information for this part?
  • What are the isotropic mechanical properties for this part?
  • Does this part meet the pre-defined geometric tolerances listed on the customer supplied 2D-Drawing for both external and internal features?

These basic questions make up the foundation that provides customer confidence in the parts that Imperial produces everyday using traditional manufacturing methods. Yet, leading experts in Additive Manufacturing struggle to answer all three of these questions with anything less than a thesis which often confuses customers and makes them weary of Additive adoption. 

The Solution

To create solutions for these problems, Solid Innovations focuses on collecting and analyzing data created during the 3D-Printing process. This technique, known as in-situ process monitoring, allows for the creation of quality & traceability data for every produced 3D-Printed part. Once created, analyzed, and stored, this collected information from 3D-Printers can be utilized to inform other components of the Additive Workflow. This inter-connectivity within the Additive environment enables increased efficiency, reduction in the Additive learning curve, and production scalability. 

Solid Innovations with Slogan Logo.png

Interested in learning more about the foundation of Solid Innovations? Check out our blog

Starting from Scratch - Solid Innovations' Initial Prototype

- University Park, State College Pennsylvania -

 Students Explain Their Capstone Projects during the Design Showcase

Students Explain Their Capstone Projects during the Design Showcase

Penn State University is known around the world for their engineering programs and graduates. To maintain a working relationship with industry and to better prepare students for challenges in the real world, Penn State requires students to work on Capstone projects for local companies.  

These projects can range widely and often are connected with other initiatives within companies sponsoring a Capstone team. Solid Innovations' Smart 3D-Printing technology provided a challenging project that offered students a glimpse at the cutting-edge of a rapidly evolving technology.

The Penn State engineering Capstone team was tasked with testing and analyzing the initial implementation of Smart 3D-Printer technology. Their analyses provided significant insight and data showcasing the initial prototypes ability to identify errors during the 3D-Printing process without input from a user.

 

Below you can read the Penn State Capstone team's final report. 


Penn State Capstone Team Project Summary

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Interested in learning about Solid Innovations' vision? Check out our blog

Getting the ball rolling - Solid Innovations' Acquires first Office

- East Stroudsburg University Business Accelerator, East Stroudsburg Pennsylvania -

Solid Innovations acquires their first office at the ESU Business Accelerator in support of their Smart 3D-Printing software.

Started in 2015, Solid Innovations has focused on making Additive Manufacturing (AM) a viable piece of the modern manufacturing supply chain. In order to accomplish this, Solid Innovations has developed software for 3D-Printers that enables them to better perform difficult tasks normally performed by highly-trained operators.

Solid Innovations' patented methodologies allows 3D-Printers to understand errors occurring in the 3D-Printing process and helps fix those errors to make better parts for customers.

 East Stroudsburg Universities Bussines Accelerator

East Stroudsburg Universities Bussines Accelerator

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The new office will enable Solid Innovations to expand their software team, enhance their equipment integration capabilities, and speed up the software development process. If you're ever in the East Stroudsburg area, feel free to drop by their office located at: 

562 Independence Road
Suite 326
East Stroudsburg, PA 18301

Solid Innovations would like to thank East Stroudsburg University for their hospitality as well as the Business Accelerator staff for their never-ending encouragement and helpfulness in launching the company to success.

 

Interested in learning about Solid Innovations' vision? Check out our blog

Growing the Team - Creation of the Solid Innovations' Software Team

- East Stroudsburg University Business Accelerator, East Stroudsburg Pennsylvania -

Team work makes the dream work, at least that's how the founders of Solid Innovations see it with their recent investment in personnel.

 Early 2015 Kick-Off meeting with the Development Team & Founders

Early 2015 Kick-Off meeting with the Development Team & Founders

Started in 2015, Solid Innovations is a software company focused on building solutions that make 3D-Printers Smart. Additive Manufacturing, more commonly known as 3D-Printing, suffers from reliability and quality issues. To combat these issues, Solid Innovations developed software for 3D-Printers that enables them to perform standard tasks more reliably without the need of a highly trained operator. This enhanced reliability stems from their patented methodologies that allow 3D-Printers to understand errors occurring in the 3D-Printing process and help fix those errors to make better parts.

Operating out of East Stroudsburg Universities Business Accelerator, Solid Innovations excels in software development by leveraging the valuable local talent from the surrounding universities and community. Solid Innovations kicked-off company growth by building a team of software programmers, engineers, and entrepreneurs from the ground up. The team's sole purpose is to develop software solutions that automate otherwise difficult to accomplish tasks in the Additive Manufacturing workflow. This is accomplished by adding artificial intelligence into day to day 3D-Printing operations. 

Creating such a team required extensive talent assessment and vetting by the original founding members of Solid Innovations. Leveraging long standing networks and partnerships with academic institutions such as East Stroudsburg University, Lehigh University, Penn State University, North Hampton Community College, and the New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT), Solid Innovations succeed in creating the brain-trust that continues to drive the company forward. 

The technically challenging nature of their work often requires Solid Innovations team members to remain at the forefront of the Additive Manufacturing revolution. This is easier said than done as 3D-Printing technology is beginning to advance at a pace rivaling the cellphone and computer markets. Team members often find themselves at Additive trade shows catching up on the newest evolutionary step in automation of the 3D-Printing process.

As members of a community with a once significant manufacturing base, the Solid Innovations' team is careful to ensure the rejuvenation of American manufacturing is at the top of their priority list. Automation continues to play a larger and larger role in manufacturing processes, not just 3D-Printing. Many who have lost jobs to offshoring see the candle burning from both ends with increased automation of manufacturing processes within the United States.

According to Solid Innovations founding member Christian M. Joest -

"A lot of folks think that automation is going to negatively impact American manufacturing. My other company, Imperial Machine & Tool Co. has been in the manufacturing business for 75 years employing hard-working, salt of the earth, people for multiple generations. Most of our staff at Imperial have been with the company for more than a decade with some having been with the company for more than thirty-years and every year we grow and create more job opportunities. The reality is automation is a large part of our success at Imperial, for generations now, its helped eliminate the back-breaking work that makes the day-to-day grind more of a toil than a habit. Automation allows Imperial to successfully compete and excel at manufacturing right here in the U.S. and I view the digital revolution in the 3D-Printing space similarly. Software solutions that remove the difficult aspects of Additive Manufacturing enable scalability for a technology capable of competing directly with overseas manufacturers. I believe automated 3D-Printing solutions are going to be a significant part of the next American industrial revolution."

Solid Innovations is poised to part-take in the digital revolution and is committed to domestic job growth and U.S. manufacturing. From their perspective, the Smart 3D-Printing technology they've developed, along with automation of the 3D-Printing process, creates new opportunities and jobs for Americans. Manufacturing is often viewed as labor intensive work with the potential for serious injury and this appears to have turned younger generations away from these types of jobs. Automated 3D-Printing processes greatly reduce physical labor requirements for manufacturing while increasing productivity. This increase in productivity provides previously non-existent job opportunities for operators, equipment manufacturers, and equipment maintenance personnel.

Solid Innovations continues to innovate and talented individuals are always in demand. If you're interested in discussing potential job opportunities, please contact John.Toth@solidinnovations.net or give them a call at 570-234-3131.

 

Interested in learning more about the foundation of Solid Innovations? Check out our blog

Lessons in Manufacturing - Solid Innovations hosts First Langan Launch Box Additive Manufacturing Course

- Penn State's Langan Launch Box, Reading Pennsylvania - 

Started in 2015, Solid Innovations, LLC, is a software company focused on creating solutions that make manufacturing equipment intelligent. Their current focus is centered on building user friendly software that makes 3D-Printers Smart in the pursuit of making 3D-Printing an easier to learn technology.

Additive Manufacturing, more commonly known as 3D-Printing, is an expensive and difficult skill to learn. The additive learning curve is steep and users often struggle with reliability and quality issues inherent in the 3D-Printing process. To resolve these headaches, Solid Innovations developed software for 3D-Printers that automates the repetitive steps of the Additive workflow to enable less skilled users to perform standard tasks more reliably. This enhanced process reliability originates from their patented technology that allows 3D-Printers to be self-aware and understand errors occurring in the 3D-Printing process.

 Local student from the Mentors for Berks Youth Program watching a 3D-Printer fabricate her part

Local student from the Mentors for Berks Youth Program watching a 3D-Printer fabricate her part

 Solid Innovations founder Joe Sinclair teaching PerceptEngine to Students

Solid Innovations founder Joe Sinclair teaching PerceptEngine to Students

To prove out their technology, Solid Innovations founder Joseph M. Sinclair partnered with Penn State Berks to act as an entrepreneur in residence within their Langan Launch Box facility. Since partnering, Solid Innovations has begun teaching local members of the community the basics of 3D-Printing while utilizing their PerceptEngine software as a teaching aid during discussions and demonstrations.

At the Langan Launch Box 3D-Printing lab, Penn State students, local community members and youth, are able to participate in 3D-Printing courses that provide the foundational skills required to understand and fabricate components with Additive processes.

Students are provided computers and 3D-Printers during the lessons and are able to make their own designs by the end of each class.

Solid Innovations, along with Penn State University, understands the importance of educating local communities on the latest advances in technology. 3D-Printing is the latest wave of innovation in the manufacturing industry and constantly evolving. In order for communities, businesses, and academia to keep up, there must continue to be an open dialogue between innovators and the manufacturing community. 

This is why Solid Innovations continues to run courses using their PerceptEngine software to better educate the public and private sectors of the newest advances in 3D-Printing technology. It's a core belief at Solid Innovations that community leadership is the key Additive Manufacturing success in America. With the support and understanding of local community members, Additive Manufacturing will usher in the next industrial revolution.

 Joseph Sinclair explaining the 3D-Printing process to students

Joseph Sinclair explaining the 3D-Printing process to students

 

Interested in learning about Solid Innovations' vision? Check out our blog!

Making a Difference - Solid Innovations' Participation in Penn State Berks' English Learners Course

- Penn State's Langan Launch Box, Reading Pennsylvania - 

Established in 1748 and settled by German emigrants, Reading Pennsylvania is known for having a long an industrious history. During the French and Indian War, Reading became the epicenter of military activity with the surrounding mountains giving rise to multiple military bases. By the time of the American Revolution, Reading became a central location for the iron industry and had a total production output greater than that of England's. While the Revolutionary War raged on, Reading's iron production supplied George Washington's troops with desperately needed cannons, rifles, and ammunition.

Reading also has roots as a genuine American melting pot. In the early 1800's Reading faced cultural challenges relating to judicial proceedings involving the German speaking Pennsylvania Dutch, specifically the hanging of Susan Cox, a German speaking resident. This event attracted world-wide attention & sympathy and helped mold the Reading as diverse an culturally accepting place.

Reading continued industrially into the 1800's and became a primary transportation hub for Pennsylvania anthracite coal through the use of canal systems. The Philadelphia and Reading Railroad Company, incorporated in 1833, took over the transportation of coal and other industrial goods until its eventual change of hands and bankruptcy in 1971. By the 1930's, Reading population had plateaued at 120,000 souls. Starting in the late 1940's, and through the 1970's, Reading saw a significant down-turn in productivity and prosperity due to a decline in coal usage, U.S. based industrial manufacturing, and a national trend of urban decline. 

Reading has since seen an economic stabilization but remains a shadow of its former self. The Reading area demographic has continued to change and has seen a significant increase in diversity, less so with German speaking emigrants this time around. The primary demographic change in recent years stems from an increase in the local Hispanic populations, which census data shows have been leaving more expensive places like New York City. As of the 2010 Census, 58.2% of Readings population is of Hispanic or Latino ancestry.

With changing demographics comes changing cultural traditions and economic impact. However, what hasn't changed is that manufacturing industries are the primary employer in the Reading region. Industrial businesses in Reading today continue to breath life into an otherwise dwindling economy. 

The local Penn State University branch campus, Penn State Berks, understands the importance of manufacturing in both Reading's history and future. To help in the rejuvenation of manufacturing in the region, Penn State Berks has started an English Learners program to help prepare members of the local Latino & Hispanic community for the industrial job market.

Program participants are familiarized with the fundamental computer skills and are taught a working vocabulary, in English, of critical computer terms. This computational foundation paves the way for participants to develop a working knowledge of 3D-Printer operation and use. In order to utilize the equipment to it's full potential, participants are taught each step of the Additive Manufacturing process from design to the final fabrication of their own 3D-model.

 Participants dilligently 3D-modeling their own designs

Participants dilligently 3D-modeling their own designs

 Bertha, who doesn't speak any English and wasn't familiar with computers, was the fastest student to design and print her individualized part. She has an unbelievable work ethic, well done!

Bertha, who doesn't speak any English and wasn't familiar with computers, was the fastest student to design and print her individualized part. She has an unbelievable work ethic, well done!

 Herandy completes her first 3D-Print, bravo!

Herandy completes her first 3D-Print, bravo!

 Ramon jokingly comments on the slowness of the Additive process

Ramon jokingly comments on the slowness of the Additive process

To effectively teach participants the ins and outs of 3D-Printing, Penn State Berks provides interpreters and leverages their industry relationship with Joseph Sinclair, founding member of Solid Innovations, LLC.

Started in 2015, Solid Innovations, LLC, provides manufacturing companies with software solutions that make the Additive Manufacturing process, also known as 3D-Printing, easier to understand and perform at scale. Solid Innovations' focus is centered on creating user friendly software that makes 3D-Printers Smart so that less user training is required for proper operation.

During the English Learners course, participants are taught how to use Solid Innovations' PerceptEngine software. PerceptEngine enables participants to 3D-Print their unique designs with ease.

The first run-through of the English Learners course at Penn State Berks' Langan Launch Box facility ended up as a tremendous success. All 11 students from various walks of life, some of which do not speak English at all, were able to successfully design and fabricate individualized 3D-Printed name-plates for themselves. 

A small victory but nonetheless a step in the right direction by teaching local community members the skills required to succeed in the next industrial revolution. Who knows, Reading Pennsylvania might just be home to the next industrial 3D-Printing facility.

Special thanks to: Paul Esqueda, Ed Sauer, Walt Fullam, Erica Kunkel, Joe Sinclair, and Solange Israel-Mintz for being the driving forces to bring this program to the community of Reading.

 

Interested in learning about Solid Innovations' vision? Check out our blog!

Taking the Intiative  - Solid Innovations' first Patent Awarded

- U.S. Patent Office, Washington D.C. - 

Intellectual property has always been a prominent feature of American ingenuity. Since the signing of the U.S. constitution in 1787, which stated, under article One, section 8, clause 8:

"Congress shall have power ... To promote the progress of science and useful arts, by securing for limited times to authors and inventors the exclusive right to their respective writings and discoveries;"

And subsequent patent & trademark office creation in 1975, the federal government of the United States has offered inventors a limited-time monopoly of twenty years, for ideas deemed novel, in the hope of encouraging the free-use and sharing of innovations after patent expiration.

To date, over 8-million patents have been granted by the United States government with no slow down in sight. An area of current rapid intellectual property growth and patent awardance is Additive Manufacturing, better known as 3D-Printing.

Experts in the field of Additive Manufacturing consider Charles "Chuck" Hull the father of 3D-Printing and often refer to his first patent on the subject, issued in 1986, as the birth date for 3D-Printing. Since 1986, 3D-Printing technology has spread from a technology initially marketed for prototyping into a full-blown manufacturing method for end-use consumer parts. 

However, the transition from prototypes to end-use parts is a difficult one, especially for a newer manufacturing technology. 3D-Printing, as a manufacturing technology, faces multiple issues preventing wide-spread adoption. High cost, slow manufacturing speed, a steep learning curve, and process inconsistency are the primary drivers hindering 3D-Printing's true potential.

 Solid Innovations' first patent

Solid Innovations' first patent

Started in 2015, Solid Innovations, LLC, set out to create new and innovative solutions to tackle these problems facing American manufacturing. Originally started as a manufacturing software company, Solid Innovations focuses on creating solutions that make manufacturing equipment intelligent.

Their current mission is centered on building user friendly software that makes 3D-Printers 'Smart' in the pursuit of making Additive an easier technology for manufacturers to utilize for mass-production.

To solve the issues preventing adoption of Additive Manufacturing, Solid Innovations developed software for 3D-Printers that automates the repetitive steps of the Additive workflow. These solutions enable less skilled users to perform standard tasks quicker and more reliably while increasing 3D-Printed component quality & traceability.

Their recently patented 'Smart' 3D-Printer technology enables 3D-Printers to be self-aware and understand errors occurring during the manufacturing process. Fabrication error detection during the manufacturing process greatly improves the adopt-ability of Additive Manufacturing.

Technologies like Solid Innovations' 'Smart' 3D-Printing might just be the spark that ignites the next American industrial revolution.

 

Interested in learning about Solid Innovations' vision? Check out our blog!

Additive Warfighters - PerceptEngine Department of Defense Integration

- Picatinny Arsenal, Morris County New Jersey - 

The U.S. Army Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center, also known as ARDEC, is a world-renowned group, within the U.S. Army Material Command, that focuses on the advancement of armament technologies and engineering innovation. ARDEC supports Army efforts to ensure Soldier survivability and enhance platform and area protection by providing engineering, design and development support. This support is essential to the rapid delivery of critical technologies to U.S. Warfighters. Beyond paving the way for new technology adoption, ARDEC provides life-cycle support for nearly 90 percent of the lethal Army systems utilized by U.S. Warfighters across the globe. 

ARDEC's principal mission is to mature technologies for armament applications while also looking for ways to transfer beneficial  and innovative technologies to the public domain for industrial & consumer applications. ARDEC's manufacturing technology program is currently transferring a variety of technologies to U.S. industry such as model-based control and environmentally safer manufacturing methods.

With the rise of 3D-Printing as a potential solution for end-use parts, ARDEC has been tasked with developing methods to implement this technology on the battle field. Their current solution, Rapid Fabrication via Additive Manufacturing on the Battlefield (R-FAB), is an easily transportable mobile manufacturing workstation that includes several 3D printers and scanners along with other traditional manufacturing equipment.

 The Army's R-FAB unit exterior

The Army's R-FAB unit exterior

 Inside the R-FAB unit at the Combined Resolve exercise in Germany

Inside the R-FAB unit at the Combined Resolve exercise in Germany

R-FAB's main purpose is to provide soldiers the ability to locally fabricate hard-to-acquire vehicle parts and equipment that would otherwise take a long time to deliver to a remote location. A recent demonstration of the R-FAB during the Combined Resolve exercises in Hohenfels, Germany showcased the units ability to effectively fabricate components for vehicles, critical life support systems, and weapon platforms on demand.

 An M4 assault rifle with 3D-printed magazine well and foregrip made with the ARDEC R-FAB unit

An M4 assault rifle with 3D-printed magazine well and foregrip made with the ARDEC R-FAB unit

However, Additive Manufacturing has draw backs that hinder wide spread adoption and implementation of 3D-Printing technology. Specific to the R-FAB, the existing 3D-Printing equipment is not easy to learn and does not collect any traceability or quality information during the fabrication process. This means that users must have high levels of training to operate the 3D-Printers and if the operator does not collect and record quality information for printed parts, then that information is lost forever. Without quality & traceability reports for each fabricated component, it is difficult to discern who printed what and when as well as how well did a specific part print. Currently, if there is an error during the 3D-Printing process, the printers are not smart enough to fix the issue or alert an operator for assistance.

 DoD & Technical Personnel review PerceptEngine R-FAB integration

DoD & Technical Personnel review PerceptEngine R-FAB integration

Started in 2015, Solid Innovations, LLC, set out to create new and innovative solutions to tackle these problems facing Additive users. Originally started as a manufacturing software company, Solid Innovations focuses on creating solutions that make manufacturing equipment intelligent.

Solid Innovations' current mission is centered on building user friendly software that makes 3D-Printers 'Smart' in the pursuit of making Additive an easier technology to use. Their patented Smart 3D-Printing technology automatically creates quality & traceability reports for every printed part while also autonomously fixing errors during the printing process.

The Department of Defense has contracted Solid Innovations to work with the ARDEC in order to implement this Smart 3D-Printing technology in manufacturing environments including the R-FAB.

The implementation of Solid Innovations' Smart 3D-Printing software automates the repetitive steps of the Additive workflow and decreases soldier training requirements for 3D-Printer utilization. Easier 3D-Printing technology enhances soldier effectiveness and equipment customization while simultaneously allowing soldiers to remain in the fight.

 

Interested in learning about Solid Innovations' vision? Check out our blog!

Passing the Torch - Solid Innovations Demonstrates 3D Printing for Local Elementary School

- Liberty Elementary School, Great Meadows New Jersey -

 Solid Innovations' Founder Joseph M. Sinclair (right) Discusses 3D-Printing w/ Students

Solid Innovations' Founder Joseph M. Sinclair (right) Discusses 3D-Printing w/ Students

Liberty Elementary School, located in the secluded hills of the surrounding Mountain Lake community, is a thriving learning environment for the young minds that inhabit its classrooms. The teaching and administrative staff here work tirelessly to provide students at Liberty with a steady stream of information and knowledge to best prepare them for a rapidly evolving world. This, however, is certainly not a novel approach, and is echoed across the country by educational institutions ranging from grade school all the way through universities.

Youth across America face increasingly competitive academic and job markets. As competition increases, both domestically and globally, educators are tasked with preparing students to succeed and excel beyond previous generations. 

To provide students with a leg up on the competition, Liberty Elementary school staff offer students the ability to join the Liberty Engineering Club. The club focuses on instilling an appreciation and love for applied sciences while building on individual student ability to identify, approach, and solve engineering problems in a logical fashion. 

 Student & Parent Flyer for The Liberty Elementary Engineering Club

Student & Parent Flyer for The Liberty Elementary Engineering Club

Previous club projects have included board game design, lighthouse architecture analysis and, most recently, bridge creation & optimization.

During the groups last meeting of the year, Solid Innovations showcased 3D-Printing technology and helped students understand the manufacturing process as they watched the machine build parts. Students were immediately drawn and fascinated by the 3D-Printer as it moved about building a whistle for their club instructor. 

It's moments like these that show 3D-Printing's potential to significantly alter how the next generation views manufacturing. This technology will change the world and greatly impact a child's education & creativity. We look forward to seeing the explosion of creativity this new generation has to offer.

 

Interested in learning about Solid Innovations' vision? Check out our blog!